Future of WorkThe future of workplace

A grey Monday morning not many years ago, a worker got into a lift ready to face a new week, with no changes or upheavals. He came out of the lift and turned around, ready to sit in his cubicle, at his usual desk with photos of his family glued to the wall. To his surprise, there was nothing there. There were no walls, there were no computers, and the tables were scattered and empty....
Catenon World3 years ago7826 min

A grey Monday morning not many years ago, a worker got into a lift ready to face a new week, with no changes or upheavals. He came out of the lift and turned around, ready to sit in his cubicle, at his usual desk with photos of his family glued to the wall. To his surprise, there was nothing there. There were no walls, there were no computers, and the tables were scattered and empty. Everyone sat where they wanted or where they could. “What has happened here?” he asked, fearing that he had got out on the wrong floor. “Reorganisation.” “Why?” he asked again. “I don’t know. It had to be done, and we did it.”

That morning, the worker experienced the change that nobody understood but that was already a reality. Something was changing, and so was the way that people work. And many other things that would come. Sometimes people didn’t know why, but just had to get on the train.

 

Motors of change

By 2020, 40% of workers are expected to be freelancers or giggers, which is expected to increase to half in the next few years, and reach 80% of the workforce by 2030; or new generations of workers seeking greater labour flexibility are some of these “drivers” of change that are also changing the relationship between people, physical workspaces, and productivity.

There is a demand for greater freedom, and greater flexibility in reconciling work and personal life. Working from anywhere and turning offices into solely collaborative environments, for the exchange of ideas.

 

At the service of the internal customer

The efficiency of spaces is crucial in this situation. Working in increasingly virtual environments demands that less and less physical space is needed, and that those that exist are as efficient as possible so that collaboration is not compromised. The spaces are now at the service of the employee and technology is a great ally. Architecture and technology come together (“techiture”) to offer digital solutions: cloud systems, meeting scheduling systems, wireless systems, IoT (light control, air conditioning, etc.), connectivity, big data, analysis and tracking systems… In short, solutions focused on the worker, the internal customer. Converting workspaces into interactive, debating and creative spaces in an “apparently” relaxed environment to increase productivity.

It is not surprising then that there is a “science” behind the design of new offices, which not only makes them more functional and efficient, but also reflects the values of the company. From the colours to the shapes of the furniture, passing through the tone of the lights or the temperature. From incorporating small rest areas or “green” zones, to creating real cities with all the services that a worker may need.

Discover some of the most interesting offices: Inside the World’s 10 Most Beautiful Offices of 2019

 

How is your office? Tell us! Leave us a comment


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Comment Policy | Privacy Policy

Related Posts

{{ image }}

{{ title }}

{{ date }} {{ comments }}
{{ readingtime }} {{ viewcount }}
{{ author }}
{{ image }}

{{ title }}

{{ date }} {{ comments }}
{{ readingtime }} {{ viewcount }}
{{ author }}
{{ image }}

{{ title }}

{{ date }} {{ comments }}
{{ readingtime }} {{ viewcount }}
{{ author }}