Future of WorkIT/Tech/DigitalThe future of Skills: Skills for the Challenges of the Future

Recent discussions on the future of jobs have focused mainly on whether or not they are at risk of being automated. But we believe the issue goes further, many jobs will still be needed for our day-to-day, However, we are confident that they will change and that this will lead to both the creation and the need for new skills and knowledge needed to carry out tomorrow’s functions. This presentation is based on the findings of...
Ines Chokron6 months ago5057 min

Recent discussions on the future of jobs have focused mainly on whether or not they are at risk of being automated. But we believe the issue goes further, many jobs will still be needed for our day-to-day, However, we are confident that they will change and that this will lead to both the creation and the need for new skills and knowledge needed to carry out tomorrow’s functions.

This presentation is based on the findings of the “Employment in 2030” study by Pearson and Nesta, which identified the skills most in demand by 2030, both in the United States and the United Kingdom. By crossing that data with tomorrow’s roles, we come up with a very specific guide to the skills and knowledge needed to succeed in the future and how employers can develop training programs (also known as upskilling) to prepare their teams.

 

What trends are we forcing us to recycle? 

As previously mentioned, jobs are already changing, and they will change at a faster pace following the crisis we are experiencing. But in addition to automation and the emergence of new technologies, there are other trends that have an impact on how jobs will change, or the new roles that will be needed in the future.

The main trends that are forcing us to recycle through upskilling are:

 

The future of work depends on new complementary skills

According to Pearson and Nesta, one tenth of the current workforce will grow in the next 10 years as a result of the natural growth of the workforce. A fifth will be reduced or will disappear. And the remaining 7 out of 10 people are likely to be part of roles to be redesigned through the upskilling of the workforce to promote growth in these occupations.

The roles and requirements associated with these roles have changed and will continue to do so in response to changes in the economic environment. Changing the skills of today’s occupations improves the likelihood that they will be in greater demand in the future. This is called “complementary skills” – and helps us think about how jobs could be redesigned to put those skills into practice, closing gaps in skills and knowledge and thus be better prepared for future challenges.

In the following table we point out the current roles with greater demand, accompanied by the current skills that most define each one, and the complementary skills or knowledge that the occupants of these roles should have by 2030 in order to face the market and technological challenges expected by then:

Centralized business strategies in skills and knowledge development

Ensuring that tomorrow’s teams have the complementary skills requires people, schools and businesses to respond appropriately. History reminds us that investing in knowledge should be at the heart of any long-term strategy to adjust to the structural change around us.

Preparing a team in these skills requires knowledge and strategy, so it is essential to create strategic alliances with specialized talent firms.

Catenon has been working for more than 20 years in the search and identification and development of skills in the best candidates globally. We work with a team of digital consultants and state-of-the-art technology that allows us to find and evaluate the best employees remotely and globally.

Our upskill and reskill services are focused on helping companies get started quickly and efficiently in these times of uncertainty.

 

 

Ines Chokron

Digital Marketing Intern at Catenon (www.catenon.com).

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